Explore Stonehenge

The great and the good have all made the pilgrimage to see Stonehenge, from Barack Obama to Miley Cyrus.

It is no surprise considering the mysterious power it has exerted throughout history. The gigantic standing stones remain a puzzle that still awe visitors today.

 

A Brief History of Stonehenge

With an unchallenged place as the world’s most popular prehistoric monument, little is known about this early structure. What is known is a little enigmatic. It was almost certainly built in several stages, with the recognisable stone circle raised in the Neolithic period, probably by about 2500 BC. But upwards of 2500 years previous to this, the first monument was erected on the same site.

Later-dated finds such as axe-heads and daggers suggest that this was a site where a range of people met and lived throughout the ages. In fact, later finds show the Romans who colonised the area were fascinated by the area, and made repeated visits to the monument. A 14th Century manuscript details the continued curiosity that the monument inspired, with Geoffrey of Monmouth writing that the wizard Merlin was responsible for erecting the stones singlehandedly!

 

stonehenge

Getting to Stonehenge

Located just off the A303, Stonehenge is difficult to miss. More…

For SATNAV: Salisbury SP4 7DE

Visiting Stonehenge

What to see

Looked after by English Heritage, there is of course the monument itself, consisting of several standing stones.
These impressible structures have puzzled historians and archaeologists for centuries, and what is known about them can be discovered in the Stonehenge Exhibition.
This is located onsite, and covers an impressible 250 archaeological objects and treasures, all uncovered in the local landscape.
Move outside to explore a set of Neolithic houses that have been constructed near the standing stones.

 

When should I visit?

Both general admissions and Stone Circle Experience have to be booked in advance, so it is worth planning ahead. If you want something special, plan your visit for the winter or summer solstice.
This will give you an evocative insight into the way our ancestors might have encountered these stones.
In the summer solstice, for example, visitors gather to watch the sunrise behind the Heel stone.

Booking a tour of Stonehenge

The best way to see the stones, and the surrounding area is to book a tour.
This will typically include a guide who will introduce you to the history, help you navigate the exhibitions and ensure you don’t miss the best views.
See availability and ticket prices for StoneHenge above and book a tour today.

Getting to Stonehenge

Located just off the A303, Stonehenge is difficult to miss.
Road access is simple from both the A303 and the A360, and is about 3-4 hours journey from London. Parking is available on site, but both bus and train access are easily navigated from Salisbury. Accessibility is simple for all, including those with additional mobility needs.

For SATNAV: Salisbury SP4 7DE

 

 

Stonehenge